Montreal – Place Jacques-Cartier

The island of Montreal is not an exotic island. In fact, it is cosmopolitan with very cold winter days. However, being by the water definitely played a major role in the settlement and the development of the city. The Saint-Lawrence River welcomed its first European visitor in 1535, Mr. Jacques Cartier. Archaeology and other evidence undeniably confirms the presence of the First Nations in and nearby the current Old Montreal.

Place Jacques-Cartier actually runs from the Old Port to Rue Notre-Dame. Many historic attractions are nearby: City Hall, the Old Palace of Justice, the Place Vauquelin, Bonaventure market, the Champ-de-Mars and the Chateau Ramezay Museum. It is very central.  St-Paul Street actually crosses the Place.

In summer, the Place is vibrant with painters, street performers, musicians and caricature artists.  Good restaurants are also available. Look and stroll Saint-Amable street. It reminds me of some Parisian vibes where artists display and sell their artwork outdoors, one next to the other.

The tall monument on the square is Nelson’s Column.

Houses Around Place Jacques-Cartier

Take the time to admire the historical houses around the square.  Some date back to the early 1800’s. The houses have been used as residential, guest houses, restaurants and more.

Place De La Dauversière

This square offers a place to sit. Located in front of the City Hall next to the Ramezay Museum, a monument to Jean Drapeau stands in the square along with a plaque in memory of the first recruiting boat from France.

Jean Drapeau was a lawyer and mayor of Montreal between 1960 and 1986 during important events and has approved major developments in the city.  He was the mayor for the construction of the Metro system, for the Olympic stadium, the Place des Arts, the World Expo 67 and also supported the welcoming of the Montreal Major Baseball League – the Expos in 1969. 

note: I’m lucky to have “B” reviewing this post.

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