Montreal – Jean-Talon Station

The Jean-Talon station is not the newest nor the oldest but its tracks are still in use today.  Completed during the recession period, it has survived through rough times with the ups and downs of the train industry. 

Even after its closure, Montreal continued believing in keeping this location a corresponding hub.  A metro station (Metro du Parc) constructed next to the station was pertinent after the closure of the Viger train station which affected the traffic to Jean-Talon.

The 1930’s grey building is indelibly an imposing structure but no longer provides the waiting room area.  The main building is now offices and a grocery store.  The EXO train that stops by lets passengers embark and disembark from an outdoor platform.  The current name is now Parc Station which bears the same name as the metro station.

At its debut, all trains to Ottawa, Quebec City, and the Laurentians originated from or finished at this station. It now serves the north part transiting via Laval, St-Therese and St-Jerome, just to name a few stops.

The building itself is a nice, imposing, solid structure without extravagant ornaments and it is supported by four massive tall columns. After all, the economic context was challenging. The name Canadian Pacific reminds us that they were the planners of this station.

The closure of the Viger train station in the early 1950’s had a direct negative impact on railway transportation that was already declining with the roadway improvement system. While barely surviving, it closed in 1983. Luckily, many businesses were established in this place. A grocery store occupies a large part of the building which brings promise to the restoration and keeps the historic character.

The well-kept front square plays a positive role for the building’s dominance in this area. Across the street, there is a beautiful statue for travelers to this station to see. For many, it marked a new beginning in this country.  The Greek community donated this monument to the city as a homage.